Political Focus: Trump claims witch hunt is over, but many are still not convinced

Ben Hume, Staff Reporter

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With the end of the investigation into Russian collusion in the 2016 presidential election, President Donald Trump appealed to his base during a rally in Grand Rapids, Mich. on March 28, 2019 by basically trying to say “I told you so.” The rally was full of fun trash talk that could have been written by a third grader, all from a man who believes the “Russia hoax is finally dead.”

He is incorrect. His claims that the “collusion delusion” is over are made in haste, in a pitiful attempt to keep his zealous fans full of hatred for the left. The Mueller report had yet to be fully released as of March 28. The only information Trump was vindicating himself with was the veritable book report written by his Attorney General William Barr.

The summary released by Barr was four whole pages long, as if summarizing three years of investigations could be written on the same number of pages as my political science essay I cobbled together in three hours last week.

And statistics back this up — according to an NPR/PBS/NewsHour/Marist poll, overall 75 percent of people polled thought the full report should be made public. This included 54 percent of Republicans polled. Only about a third of Americans believe, from what they’ve seen from the Mueller investigation, that Trump is completely innocent.

It’s clear even his own supporters aren’t completely convinced Trump is out of the woods yet, so perhaps a rally to convince his supporters would be a good idea. A rally where Trump can provide some evidence and arguments that would convince people of his innocence.

Or he could spend an hour talking about how Adam Schiff is on an artificial respirator because he’s so heartbroken.

Representative Adam Schiff, Democratic overseer of the House Intelligence Committee, was the butt of many jabs by the president.

After joking that the committee was on “artificial respirators right now,” he said, “they’re giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Little pencil-neck Adam Schiff. He’s got the smallest, thinnest neck I’ve ever seen.”

In addition to the childish bullying, Trump dished out some of the crassest language he’s ever used in his public speeches. He used “hell” and “damn,” but even more startling was when he said, “The Democrats need to decide whether they will continue to defraud the public with ridiculous bullshit.”

He followed that with a classic “I’m president and they’re not,” then rounded it all off by praising his own intelligence.

All this being said, the president has never acted with the dignity his office deserves. His swearing, bullying and unprofessional attitude are a blight we are familiar with. But the idea that he thinks he can force his way into innocence using these methods is horrifying, because there are enough people who would believe him. And that is not how a democracy can be allowed to work.

The Mueller investigation was not a power grab, nor was it a ploy by the Democratic party to frame “innocent Americans.” And the Trump presidency has definitely not “done more…in the first two years than any administration in history.”

In conclusion, Trump’s time in Michigan was a historically large waste of time, a dangerous power grab and a failure to truly show his innocence to the nation. We deserve the truth, and I believe there is still more to learn about the secret dealings of our 5-year-old president.