Students have mixed opinions about new grading system

Alyssa Ochss, Staff Intern

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The new grading system at Oakland University has been getting mixed reviews from students.

This new system uses letter grades for classes instead of the numbers of a standard GPA. Though the numbers are still used, for example the letter grade A- would be equivalent to a 3.7 GPA, it is a new change where the grade determines the GPA instead of a number grade. An example of this would be a 95 being a 3.7 or an A-.

This change has left some students feeling confused, while others are content with its effect on how professors and faculty will grade their classes.

Alice Dahlka, who studies human resource management, is among those who are confused and disgruntled with the new grading system. She said that it depended on her classes when it came to whether her grades were lowered or raised under the new system.

According to Dahlka, one of her biggest issues with the system is that it takes away her sense of accomplishment in her grades.

“I would rather see the number,” she said. “I am prouder of a 4.0 than an A.”

Dalhka also fears that the new grading system would have adverse effects on students, and that it would decrease their chances for better grades.

“There is a greater opportunity to round students down than to help them out,” Dalhka said. “However, it is too early to notice any positives about it.” 

Dale Dubia, who is a senior at OU, is on the opposite side of the spectrum and thinks that the new system would be beneficial to professors when grading their assignments.

“I feel it’s easier for professors because they can give simple letter grades,” he said. “I can understand why it is easier than a 3.65.”

Dubia said his grades have overall stayed the same since the new system was enacted. However, the system did come as a surprise to him, and he said he will be constantly checking Moodle to be sure that the grades are accurate.

Dubia reported that he likes the new system of grading and doesn’t mind that it has been implemented. Although he agrees that the system would be beneficial for the professors, he said he could see why other students would be upset or thrown off by it.

“Some people are too used to the grade point to go back to the letter grades,” Dubia said.

It still might be too early to notice any adverse or positive effects that the new grading system has on students. Some students are left to ask what will happen if their grades fall within the middle grades from the GPA system, such as a 3.8 or 3.9.

New coming students from high school may not have a problem with the new system, while older students will possibly have a harder time since they are so used to the GPA system. Therefore, the adjustment rate is dependent upon each students college level.

More information about the grading system changes can be found on the Office of the Registrar page.