Student org profile: Mathematics Student Society

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Student org profile: Mathematics Student Society

courtesy of the Math Club

courtesy of the Math Club

courtesy of the Math Club

Falin Hakeem, Staff Reporter

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With more than just the goal of getting a good grade, the Mathematics Student Society (MSS) at Oakland University consists of a group of students who study the subject in a multitude of ways.

“Our mission is to bring students together to hear educational talks, form study groups, volunteer in the community, learn about careers in math and enjoy great company and food,” said president of the society, Joy Clouse.

The society, which has 30 members, started out with a group of students in Professor Tony Shaska’s Abstract Algebra course in the winter of 2017 that first spent most days at Kresge Library individually, and then realized they had more knowledge together than apart.

MSS tries to have at least one meeting a month where professors come to talk about mathematics education, and companies such as Brose Inc. come visit the club to recruit students employees.

“Our end-of-semester event was at Fibonacci Bowling, where students calculated their score based on the Fibonacci sequence,” Clouse said. “This semester we are planning a tour of the Ford Rouge Factory, to attend math conferences, a Pi Day event and more talks by professors or grad students.”

MSS’ first event of the year will be Thursday, Feb. 1 at noon in MSC 378. Professor Anna Spagnoulo will be giving a talk regarding her research. Lunch will also be provided.

“The most exciting part of being a part of MSS is being included in the math community at OU and the math department’s support, including giving us an office to call home,” Clouse said.

The society is currently looking for future officers to continue the work of bringing students together to form this mathematics community.

For more information, please visit the Mathematics Society’s Grizz Org’s page.