Saoirse Ronin Soars in “Lady Bird”

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Saoirse Ronin Soars in “Lady Bird”

coutesy of IMDb

coutesy of IMDb

coutesy of IMDb

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Everybody loves a good angsty teen movie with an indie twist, right? Now, I’m usually the type to go for the commercialized, surface-level angsty teen movie, but I heard so many wonderful things about “Lady Bird” that I had to see what everyone was ruffling their feathers about.

Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird” is a coming-of-age film that takes place in the year 2002 in Sacramento, Calif. The heart and soul of the film, 17-year-old Christine, who likes to call herself “Lady Bird” (Saoirise Ronin) is a high-strung  high school senior who goes to a Catholic high school.

She is going through what all seniors in Catholic and non-Catholic high school are going through; applying for the colleges of their dreams, finding themselves and feeling like their mother is out to get them. Ah, the good old high school stress.

Though the plot of this movie may sound terribly simple and cliche, it is actually quite the opposite. Mostly because it is raw and relatable, but it also has a hold on the audience because it makes them stop and think about their own lives. Many people have experienced feeling like we don’t belong to the name that was given to us, and that’s what our protagonist in this film goes through. She comes to define herself in her own terms. As Christine would say, “Lady Bird was given to myself by myself.”

The film took me back to my high school days. Even as a senior in college, I feel like I could understand where Lady Bird was coming from and her struggles. Not in all instances, but definitely the whole wanting to be accepted yet trying to remain true to oneself type of ordeal. Even though Lady Bird is younger than many college students, her struggles of growing up can resonate with those of us still trying to figure out who we want to be.

Ronin’s performance completely makes her deserving of an Oscar for her role as the titular Lady Bird. Her character’s imperfections were what made her character so lovable, and she portrays them perfectly. Even the nun at the Catholic school found her flaws to be enjoyable. Her relationship with her mother also deserves some recognition for how brutally truthful it is.

However, one of the most beautiful parts of the film was the ending. While the beginning of the film starts out with her and her mother getting into a heated argument in the car about Lady Bird wanting to leave Sacramento and going to college on the east coast instead, the last scene offers a well-rounded close to the tale.

“Lady Bird” surely deserved the hype it got from all of the critics and box office records. I think it especially hits close to home because it’s a film held up by a female lead in a film that’s not action or sci-fi.

Rating: 5/5 stars